Award Winners

The Canadian Council of University Biology Chairs (CCUBC) offers several awards each year.

Hannah Adams

2023 CCUBC Undergraduate Paper Award

Hannah Adams
University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON.


Island biogeography theory and the urban landscape: stopover site selection by the silver-haired bat (Lasionycteris noctivagans) (PDF)

2023 CCUBC Undergraduate Paper Award

Hannah Adams
University of Waterloo, Waterloo, ON.


Island biogeography theory and the urban landscape: stopover site selection by the silver-haired bat (Lasionycteris noctivagans) (PDF)

Kirsten M. Müller's Nominaiton Letter for Hannah Adams (PDF)

Dr. Liam McGuire's letter of Support for Hannah Adams(PDF)

Hannah Adams completed her BSc at the University of Waterloo in 2021. In her honours thesis, she used acoustic monitoring to investigate how bats use urban forests as stopover locations during their fall migration as these forest patches represent “islands” of useable habitat in a sea of agricultural fields and paved urban spaces. She was specifically looking at the relationship between the size, shape, and isolation of urban forests and the number of recorded bat calls for each species. This led to the publication of “Island biogeography theory and the urban landscape: stopover site selection by the silver-haired bat (Lasionycteris noctivagans)” in the Canadian Journal of Zoology. Hannah has continued on to complete her MSc in Biology at the Memorial University of Newfoundland and Labrador in 2023, where she studied the impacts of natural and anthropogenic forest disturbances on a terrestrial-aquatic meta-ecosystem through a combination of in situ data collection, geospatial analysis, and mathematical modelling. She plans to continue researching how climate change and anthropogenic activity are affecting both individual species and interconnected ecosystems.

Marybelle Cameron-Pack

2023 CCUBC Undergraduate Paper Award

Marybelle Cameron-Pack
University of New Brunswick, Fredericton, NB.


A personal cost of cheating can stabilize reproductive altruism during the early evolution of clonal multicellularity (PDF)

Dr. Aurora M. Nedelcu's Nominaiton Letter for Marybelle Cameron-Pack (PDF)

Marybelle Cameron-Pack graduated from the University of New Brunswick in 2023 with two degrees: an Honours in Biology and a Major in English. During her undergraduate, she had the opportunity to work with many rigorous scientists such as Dr. Timothy Erickson, Dr. Bryan Crawford, and Dr. Aurora Nedelcu. Her work in Dr. Nedelcu’s lab was fuelled by her budding interest in the evolution of cooperation and altruism. Her paper “A personal cost of cheating can stabilize reproductive altruism during the early evolution of clonal multicellularity“ showed that Volvox’s personal benefit of cheating, which allows for an individual’s own increased reproduction, is ultimately trumped by the increased cost of survival due to increased sensitivity to stress. Since her work in Nedelcu’s lab, this evolutionary perspective has become central to her way of explaining biological processes, specifically as she tries to understand and explain degenerative diseases. Marybelle was granted a Research Excellence Scholarship which will allow her to pursue her PhD in Ophthalmology at University College London in the UK, starting in 2024.

Jillian C. Dunic

2023 CCUBC Graduate Student Research Prize

Jillian C. Dunic
Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, BC


Management thresholds shift under the influence of multiple stressors: Eelgrass meadows as a case study (PDF)

Dr. Isabelle M. Côté's nomination letter for Jillian Dunic (PDF)

Jillian Dunic is a biologist at the Department of Fisheries and Oceans Canada, where she studies trends in groundfish species abundance and distribution to support effective management. She completed their PhD in spring 2023 and was driven by a commitment to improving the management of coastal habitats. Her PhD research focused on seagrass meadows, using them as a model system to examine the impacts of multiple stressors at various scales. Overall her research emphasized the significance of local context in seagrass management while also revealing generalizable patterns in how multiple stressors affect seagrass performance. In her paper, "Management thresholds shift under the influence of multiple stressors: Eelgrass meadows as a case study," she aimed to identify practical management targets and understand how these targets might shift when eelgrass is subject to multiple stressors. She found that crucial growth-related values, such as shoot persistence and the maximum growth rate of eelgrass (Zostera marina), shifted in response to the co-occurring changes in temperature and light. This work highlights the need for adaptable management strategies in habitats facing multiple stressors.

Amalie Hutchinson

2023 CCUBC Science Promotion Prize

Amalie Hutchinson
Western University, London, ON.


Dr. James Satples nomination letter for Amalie Hutchinson (PDF)

Amalie Hutchinson Cover letter (PDF)

GradCast from Western to the World (PDF)

Amalie Hutchinson completed a Bachelor's of Medical Science with honours specialization in biochemistry at Western University (2019) but found her true calling in biology when she began an MSc (2022) in biology at Western in Jim Staples' research lab. Her master's work involved how electron transport system supercomplexes change in mitochondria during hibernation in ground squirrels. During her MSc, Amalie joined the GradCast editorial board as an interview host, trained as a producer, and was elected managing editor and chair in 2022. Amalie joined Chris Guglielmo's lab for her PhD work where she is co-supervised by Jim Staples. Her thesis aims to investigate how the physiology of flying heterotherms (hummingbirds and bats) changes during daily torpor and hibernation. Outside the lab, Amalie is a birder, reader, and boardgame player.

No nominations were received.